Sometimes it’s good to forget. Sometimes it’s hard to forget. And there are some times when we forget things we should remember. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated with the intent of keeping the sacrifices of fallen soldiers in memory. The friends and loved ones of the fallen often leave tokens of their remembrance at the site of the memorial: flags, sealed letters, pieces of clothing, and photos.

One vet left dog tags, a headband, and a letter which read, “To all of you here from Echo Company, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division . . . I leave you my headband which contains my sweat from the war, my dog tag, and a picture of me and Mike. Another time, another place. I’ll never forget you.”

The wife of a fallen soldier left a braid of her hair, along with a picture of a house with an American flag hanging at the porch. Her note said, “Wayne, I think of you every day and miss you so much. I love you.”

A memorial need not be elaborate to be special. It should only come from the heart. The smallest token of love and appreciation causes the memory of the one honored to live on. This is why Jesus told His disciples to use bread and grape juice in His memory. We call this Communion. This sacrament is observed in obedience to Christ’s words, but it also serves as a memento of the agony and triumph of His sacrifice. Communion is our way of saying to Jesus, I’ll never forget you.

Some things are too precious to forget — the cross, the nails, the suffering Savior, the penalty Jesus paid for our sins, the forgiveness of sin, and the resulting salvation of all who believe. Keep them in your memory through your church’s Communion service as well as in your times of personal reflection, lest you forget.

Devotional by Pastor Jim Scudder, Jr.